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Chris

WHEN DID YOU START RIDING?
I got my license when I was 18 years old, living in Minnesota. However, the scene there at the time was not one that I really wanted to be part of (I ran into a lot of sexist and racist people), and I ended up falling out of love with bikes for quite a while. My passion was reignited when I moved to the United Kingdom in 2006.

WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST BIKE?
First bike that I personally owned was a 2005 HondaCBF600SA. The least sexy of all the unsexy bikes.

WHAT BIKE DO YOU HAVE NOW?
Currently ride a 2017 Triumph Tiger Explorer XRX. It's also terribly unsexy but goes fast and is damned useful.

WHAT BIKE WOULD YOU LIKE TO HAVE?
I often think about getting an Indian Scout and customizing it. I also daydream about using a Harley-Davidson Road King or Indian Chieftan Limited as my everyday bike. That all assumes that I kept my day job of riding a lot of different bikes. If I had to give up moto-journalism and settle on just one machine I'd probably stick with my Tiger Explorer.

WHY IS RIDING IMPORTANT TO YOU?
I have built a career on answering that question. But the short answer is that it allows me to connect with the world around me in ways not possible in a car; I feel very much a part of the environment. Riding helped stabilize me when I was in a deep depression and it affords me a sense of independence in an increasingly restrictive world.

WHAT WOULD YOU DO IF ILL-HEALTH PREVENTED YOU FROM RIDING?
Buy a Can-Am Spyder. If I were too ill for that I'd pray for a self-driven car, from which I could smash out all the windows to at least approximate the feeling of being in the wind.


Editor's note: Chris Cope is director of RideApart and one of my favourite motorcycling writers because he isn't afraid to put his heart on paper. Check out this article about the little wooden shed he keeps his bike in to see what I mean. 

If you would like to contribute, send your answers to the six questions to graydenprovis1@gmail.com (along with pictures if you like) and I'll put it up same day.

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Grayden

WHEN DID YOU START?
I was a late bloomer. Didn't get my licence until very recently at age 57. It was something I always wanted to do but believed all the "it's too dangerous" advice and never pursued it.

WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST BIKE?
It's the one I'm riding now as I'm still on my RE licence. It's a 2010 250cc Suzuki Intruder. I feel a bit like a grasshopper on it as it's really a bit small for my frame but hey, I'm just enjoying being out there!

WHAT BIKE HAVE YOU GOT NOW?
See above.

WHAT BIKE WOULD YOU LIKE TO HAVE?
I already have it! It's the white Suzuki Boulevard C50T below. It was love at first sight when I saw it at Rick Gill Motorcycles and I knew I had to have it. It's basically a clone of those classic 1950's Harley cruisers and is what I've long had in my mind as a "real" motorbike if ever I should get one. Only problem is I can only ride it on L's for now so it sits in the garage a lot of the time. Doesn'…

Actions speak louder than words

So when I shut down all my other blogs (8 or 9 of them) but keep this one, it's telling me something about where my interests really lie :)


But wait, there's more. In order to scrape together enough to buy The White Knight, I flogged off everything that wasn't nailed down.


Even my beloved drum kit. If you'd have asked me a few years ago if that would ever happen, I would have said there's a greater chance of the Pope joining the Orange People. But there it is. I did it. And I haven't regretted it for a second.

This bike has its weaknesses, but comfort is definitely not one of them. Its ergonomics are so perfect for me it's ridiculous. It's as if it was custom-made for me. And the suspension is so sweet you just glide over the bumps as if they're not there.

Now that the odometer has finally clicked over the first 1,000km (and that all-important first service has been done), I'm looking forward to cracking open the throttle a bit more and seeing w…

Monkey off the back

They say you never really grow up until your mother dies. And I would say that motorcyclists never really grow up until they've dropped their bike. 












So now I've done it. Yes! The White Knight ended up on its side in the carpark yesterday as I practiced some tight figure eights. Too tight as it turned out. And the bike was too heavy for this old codger to save. No damage bar a few scratches but a whole lot of weight off the shoulders. And a whole lot wiser to boot 😜. (I also found out how easy it is to lock the rear wheel on a long wheel-base cruiser under heavy braking: REAL easy 😬).

I was reading yesterday that guys hire bikes to take to rider training so they can't drop their Harleys, Goldwings etc. Meh. It might cost you a few battle scars but I reckon it's invaluable to find out where YOUR bike's limits are. Now to find out what it feels like to lean over far enough to scrape a floorboard on the White Knight. Still working up to that one 👀.